Fundamentals of Change

Fundamentals of Change
Mapping the Major Features of Change Choosing Tactics for Change
Why? “The road to hell is paved with good intentions” – St. Bernard of Clairvaux
Not all change projects are the same. Their characteristics differ.
However, this difference in fundamental characteristics is often overlooked in the dash to get projects started.
Some simple and quick upfront analysis can reduce the probability of costly unintended consequences.
“Proper planning & preparation prevents piss poor performance” – British Army
Commitment and engagement are words often heard at the beginning of organisation change projects, but seldom are the consequences fully thought through.
Resistance to change by people is inevitable, whether expressed or not expressed.
Some simple and quick upfront analysis can reduce the probability of costly unintended consequences.
What? Features of Change offers a straightforward structure that pinpoints where ‘hotspots’ are likely to occur.
The expression ‘forewarned is forearmed’ most definitely applies here.
he pacing of change is down to the resistance you expect and the tactics you are prepared to deploy. There is genuine choice in these matters.
You could push through it, like Frank ‘hurry-up’ Crowe, the project director for the construction of the Hoover Dam. Or you could plan and set aside resources for commitment building.
The choice is yours, but Caveat Emptor.
How? Depending upon the characteristics of a change project it may move quicker or slower.
A graphic of the eight characteristics of bounded and unbounded change is used to map participants’ organisation change projects.
It then focuses attention on the pacing of change and any ‘hotspots’ that might affect projected timelines.
Participants are asked come armed with a specific organisation change project they wish to address. This may be historical, current or about to commence.
Pacing of change based on an analysis of its major variables is the platform for Choosing Tactics.
It then builds into a matrix based on:

  • Four types of resistance, and
  • Six methods for dealing with resistance.

The implications for the organisation change leader, and planning to address them, concludes Choosing Tactics.
Participants are asked come armed with a specific organisation change project they wish to address. This may be historical, current or about to commence.

Workplace Applications
  • Knowing when to move faster or slower on an organisation change project
  • A simple-to-apply change ‘tool’
  • Reduces the probability of costly unintended consequences
  • Planning and preparing for resistance and how to deal with it
  • Greater insight into the people issues of change projects
  • A simple to apply change ‘tool’
  • Reduces the probability of costly unintended consequences